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 Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play

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Ninja_Named_Bob



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PostSubject: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 7:47 pm

Introduction

Years of active role-play have assisted my ability in writing, from becoming much more easily understood in the message I wished to convey, to working on a novel to publish. Although few would claim I've possessed a talent for words since my youngest years, it's only been in the past 5yrs that a marked improvement in my ability to articulate (verbally and through written word) has improved. Although efforts to transmit these improvements through educating others have rarely been effective, it's never a bad idea to at least provide others a means to improve their own ability.

Writing is an art-form; words are what make and break entire nations. While there are those who may argue that war, violence, bigotry, and other things can lead to the downfall of an empire, it is only through words that it is possible. Articulation isn't simply saying something, but how you say it. Expression is only completely understood when there is a means to convey meaning. In that way, words carry more weight than even the heaviest material known.

So, what does this have to do with role-play? Who benefits from this lengthy introduction and explanation that is only partly relevant to the intended subject? You do. Dear reader, your growth, understanding, and ability to express yourself relies solely on the words you use and how you use them. In this multi-part explanation, I hope to help you improve your ability to role-play and, in doing so, improve your ability to articulate all-around.

Kind reader, take my hand and let us begin!


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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 8:25 pm

Part 1: Details Are Essential

Perhaps the greatest weakness of a newer role-player is a lack of details in their posts. In situations where combat takes place, explaining what the character is doing and how becomes key. Showing what your character is doing is not the only part, though; a compelling narrative requires many details. The secret is finding a balance between too much and too little, which is often-times difficult for persons who have preferences on what kinds of details they consider "important". An example of too little is:

"Kai swings his sword at Rob's neck to cut his head off."

Already, we are missing three essentials.

>Where is the sword coming from?
>What hand is holding the sword?
>Where is Kai standing in reference to Rob?

Acknowledging the first two details is essential in a hypothetical scenario, and only applicable at that point. When we put it into practice, the third detail becomes important during an actual scene, wherein the audience must be made aware of where the two combatants stand, and how far apart. So, we improve on that.

"Kai stepped forwards facing Rob, standing within two paces of him holding a sword in his right hand. He leveled the sword at shoulder height and drew the weapon back, then swung it with intent to cut Rob's head off."

This tells us the three essentials.

>We know where the sword is coming from
>We know what hand is wielding the sword
>We know where the two are standing with respect to each other

Going beyond this without flowery prose is not necessary. "Spiffing up" a post is a good idea, yes; but it is by no means a requirement. There are those who may find flowery language quite distasteful, or those who enjoy it. What you must be aware of is who your audience is and what their expectations for your work are. Anything outside of that is excess and can get overwhelming to a partner who may not be as experience or able.

In the same respect, too much detail becomes overbearing. A partner that cannot communicate what they mean in as many words as it takes them to "beautify" their posts has utterly failed in their intentions. An example:

"Kai stepped to within 4ft of Rob, body positioned upright 90 degrees from the ground whilst raising his 3ft sword to a horizontal height and withdrawing it nearest his left side, then swinging it at near-instant speed on a 15 degree angle towards Rob's neck; the center-most edge of Kai's sword poised to cut through Rob's neck and cause the head to part from the shoulders."

Already, this annoys me. What details did we not need?

>Knowing your body's exact position in mathematical degrees from the ground
>The exact measurement of distance Kai is standing from Rob
>The sword's length, while essential in most cases, can be an assumed measurement according to what type of sword it is. In most cases, a pre-written profile may exist to tell us that detail. It's redundant unless otherwise stated.
>The usage of mathematical terminology in expressing where the sword is pre-swing.
>The use of "near-instant". One could argue the differential in speed between persons, yes, but one assumes (unless otherwise implied) that any attack is at full speed and power.
>Explaining what part of the sword is aimed at Rob's neck. Knowing this detail doesn't mean Rob survives if he adjusts that measurement slightly. It becomes redundant.

So, while one is sufficient, and the other is repetitious, why are neither considered "entertaining"? The answer is simple: neither contains the characters. Explaining an action should go beyond simply saying "x character does y". What are their feelings? Are they experiencing symptons of fatigue or illness? What is the purpose of the attack? Why is there an attack? A good story tells you something is happening; a great story shows you it's happening.

"Kai stepped before Rob, his brow furrowed in annoyance at the pompous, uncouth braggart and his utterly chauvinistic behavior. His right hand went to the hilt of the sword sheathed at his left hip, withdrawing it slowly in practiced restraint, anticipating the demise of such an uncivilized creature as that which he stood before. Towering over Kai, Rob grinned with malicious amusement, measuring the young man before him as though appraising a plate of food prior to consumption. In a flurry of motion, Kai's right arm came up and drew back toward's his left, then swung with deadly precision towards Rob's neck, the sole intent of which were to remove the uncouth waste of Human filth's head from his shoulder's and extinguish the blight he cast upon the whole of Humankind simply through existing."

Already, I want to know what happens next. Does the strike connect? Does Rob dodge it, or does he simply take the hit with no damage? Is Kai doomed, or does he inevitably win the conflict and impress any onlookers? We don't talk about an audience unless it's established that the setting is where a group of people may witness the event. As things are, our most immediate interest is on Kai, Rob, and the conflict between these two.

Details that are essential are the following:

>What is happening?
>How is it happening?
>Where is it happening?

Other details such as audience, lighting, etc are a result of the setting itself and the three listed details. If we know nothing about what is happening, how can we be sure that what we're witnessing is important or relevant to the overarching plot? If we don't know how it's happening, how can we attach significance to what is happening? If we don't know where it is happening, how can we know that it's even happening to begin with?

In the same way, over-explaining the details about your setting can bore an audience. Most audiences only want to know the barest amount of information unless it relates to the plot itself. And that, dear reader, is the intro to our next part.


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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 8:43 pm

Part 2: Russian Roulette with Anton Chekov

As Anton Chekov wrote:

Quote :
Remove everything that has no relevance to the story. If you say in the first chapter that there is a rifle hanging on the wall, in the second or third chapter it absolutely must go off. If it's not going to be fired, it shouldn't be hanging there.

Perhaps the most under-used and yet, most essential trope in any form of visual medium, Chekov's Gun demands that something which is paid extraordinary attention and relevance in one part must be essential later on. If you say your character is tired and out of breath in one post, it isn't simply a detail; it is a key plot element. If your character is charmed, it should not be written off by them as a minor status effect that goes away once your partner's post ends. It must stick with them or not be mentioned to begin with.

Chekov's Gun isn't limited to dramatic works or mediums where only one person (or one group) is in charge of things that happen next. Indeed, if we assume a role-player is a writer of sorts, then we must assume that two role-players are collaborators on a piece of writing. If we go further, it seems fair to assume that if one writer establishes something as happening/pays mind to a detail they deem essential, then it is the onus of their partner to acknowledge that essential detail and respond accordingly. To do otherwise is dishonest.

So, how do we use Chekov's Gun in role-play? Well, that is what I want to show you!

Say, for example, I state my character running through the forest away from an assailant and they trip, falling under the cover of foliage. Then, it is on my partner to acknowledge not just that my character has tripped, but that I've established they're now hidden. If I mention in one post that my character had consumed a potion that made them dizzy, then it is essential for me to convey my character's current status throughout, or until it's established that they're cured. My partner is simply required to play their part through their character reacting accordingly.

In the same way, if my partner says "x kisses y, causing a charm effect" then it is on me to show that my character is suffering from the status effect. Simply having my character say "that was mildly inconvenient" and continue on as though they're wholly unaffected is dishonest to my partner and blatantly ignores their contribution. In the same way, if my opponent is affected by something that stuns their character but only states the stun and nothing about how their character behaves as a result, it's dishonest to me as a writer and ignores my contribution. When Chekov's Gun is inevitably invoked in role-play, it becomes essential for both sides to pay mind to that detail and respond accordingly.

But, what of role-play that is based entirely on the tabletop system? Dear reader, our next part is reserved for just those situations!


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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 8:55 pm

Part 3: Puppets and Puppeteers

One of the worst mistakes a role-player can make is assuming something happens when interacting with a character controlled by another role-player. In most circles, it is considered an "auto" to assume something happens to a character someone else controls, even if the character has no means to avoid it. In these cases, it can cause an immediate breakdown in interaction and lead to people becoming upset with each other over an outcome. The most essential part of role-playing is being sure that you're allowing your partner an opportunity to do something rather than assuming what you want to happen, happens.

This goes both ways, unfortunately. While assuming something happens to someone else's character is annoying, it can work for the reverse, as well. If your partner assumes details based on the information you presented, or tries to suggest their character avoided their fate through means unknown, it can still be considered an "auto" because it removes the possibility of input from one side. In any situation where one side is denied input, it can be considered an "auto". In this way, trouble starts.

So, what of settings that use a dice-roll system?

The issue is exacerbated because communication is limited to a randomized outcome rather than peer-based interaction. A method to alleviate this matter is to have one side perform an action with a set percentile of its likeliness of succeeding, and have the other side perform a dice-roll and respond based on those results. In a setting where users can't verify with their own eyes the results, trust must be taken at face-value. There may be resources that exist where the outcome can be verified by both sides; but not all role-playing settings have access to such.

Regardless, it is rude and improper to assume something happens without the input of your partner. If they possess the means to escape their situation, or if a situation refuses the possibility, then it is only proper to give them an opportunity to give their input. Otherwise, the story is less appealing and leaves both partners and the audience rather discontent with the outcome.

And on that note, we go to our next part!


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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 9:16 pm

Part 4: Outcome

What upsets an audience more than a poorly-written story? Is it the death of a well-loved character? Is it when the plot becomes near-incomprehensible? Is it when a writer uses the easiest, most-expected answer to a mystery, or makes the mystery so difficult to solve that their audience has to question how they drew such a conclusion? While all these things are definitely turn-offs for an audience, none of them necessarily spells the doom of your work. In that way, too, such things in a role-play are only as harmful as they are integral to the overarching plot itself. If their presence is moderate and don't affect the work overall, then your partner isn't as likely to quit partway through.

The conclusion, on the other hand, can be damning. A conclusion that fails to satisfy whoever is viewing your work can cause a wholly negative reception. This is no more poignant than when Mass Effect 3 fell short of expectations during the conclusion. An ending which refuses to acknowledge the investment that an audience has made in sticking with the story from the beginning and throughout is not simply insulting; it supposes that our time wasn't worth spending telling a good story to begin with. If a conclusion does little to satisfy the audience in terms of what they want to know but manages to be "final" and sufficiently satisfies them, it gives the audience reason to pay attention to the rest of your works.

In that way, as well, a role-play isn't simply a work for third-party interest, but for that of the persons involved. A role-play that concludes without satisfying the persons involved and fails to meet their expectations despite having built itself up to a point is going to rub people the wrong way. When people are rubbed the wrong way, they are less likely to involve themselves with certain partners and may even feel it necessary to warn others against those persons in the future. Failure to meet expectations and even acknowledge the time you were given by others is disrespect in its most raw form.

In the same way, a role-play that doesn't tie all its loose ends but feels satisfying regardless can pave the road for criticism and help by others to improve your ability to write a more concise ending in the future. In the same way, telling us too much about the aftermath can be overwhelming and make the audience feel like you're adding extra fluff for the sake of extra fluff. When we look at the lessons as they've been relayed so far, telling your audience about the future of your characters can make them wonder why such a detail is important. Is it not better to let us assume what happens?

An audience form an medium is necessary to ensure the success of a work. This also applies to role-playing; if a partner is dissatisfied, your choices for partners in the future will diminish.

Of course, this entire part can be considered an innuendo for the next part. How's that for a conclusion?


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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 9:37 pm

Part 5: Writing is a form of sex

Words are beautiful. Words are living, breathing works of precision and effective inter-personal relations. Words are a delicious, filling plate of food that leaves you both full and satisfied. Words are a seductive tease, preying on your desires and leaving you weak and wanting more.

Did that last part make you tilt your head?

If not, then congratulations! You understand all you'll ever need to know and this entire work has been a rather pointless (and perhaps informative) investment on your part. You may discontinue reading, knowing full-well that you've reached the peak of creative writing and now only need to apply it. Truly, you will go far with your skill!

If, though, you did and must be contemplating the sanity of someone who would even allude to such a crude simile, I'll have you know that my mental health is far from the most concerning issue here. If ever you've been to a bar or a venue where strangers interact with each other frequently, then there is merit to what I'm saying. Whether or not you wish admit it is another story. Rather, why don't we focus on the subject of this work?

Role-play is a give and take, an exchange between two persons where one person gives and receives something as compensation for their efforts. In that way, we can compare word-play to love-making, since it requires both sides derive a form of pleasure. If one side cannot reciprocate in full what they receive, then the other side will feel rather dissatisfied and might quit halfway through. In the same way, a lover that gives too much may cause their partner to grow uncomfortable or unsure and want to quit in the middle of a session.

The biggest problem partners face in a role-play is communication. If a partner does not communicate what they want, or does not properly allude to what it is they are wanting to take away from the interaction, then the other role-player(s) might not be inclined to respond in a way that suggests they understood what is being requested. This works the other way around, as well. If a partner(s) knows what is being asked of them and ignores it or otherwise rejects the idea, their partner might not feel inclined to continue from that point. There are ways to avoid such conflicts, though.

1) Explain what you want prior to starting a role-play. If your partner isn't interested or might be uncomfortable, then it is best to stop there and part ways. If a compromise can be reached, then continue and don't press the matter.

2) Don't rely on your partner picking up on the subtle hints you drop. Subtlety in a role-play should be reserved for the interaction between characters and not for the role-players themselves. Be clear and concise.

3) If your partner is alluding to something you both discussed but doesn't want to give it away completely as a way of allowing you to "have the honors", then don't hesitate to take the reigns. A partner that is decisive and can take control is a partner that can exhumes confidence. Even if you go too fast or move towards the conclusion a bit too quickly, it's not the end of your role-playing career. Simply, you'll have opportunities in the future to improve!

Finally, don't be afraid to do something new! If you feel confident in doing something unexpected or having a "twist" in the middle of a role-play, it shows your partners that you're not afraid to tread new territory and might even inspire them to go down that path with you! Don't be afraid of things that are outside your "norm" or that have the potential to make you uncomfortable. Trying new things is the spice of life!

And sometimes, "spicy" is what the doctor ordered!


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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 10:15 pm

Part 6: Don't make fun of it, don't destroy it, don't cheapen it...

As "Through the Night" by Arimachi Masahiko starts off, it tells the viewer "don't make fun of/don't destroy/don't cheapen... that one thing everyone has." While it's a bit silly to quote lyrics from an anime opening and apply them to a lesson, the words are fairly relevant for a lot of reasons. For one, there are always going to be people with their own style of writing. Another point is, while you may not enjoy a certain style or how things proceed, that is by no means a reason to dismiss someone outright. Sometimes, their interests and style can have a profound influence on yours, or vice-versa. To think otherwise is arrogant presumption.

However, we fall into the trap of trying to be "too kind". To quote another anime, "Kindness can sometime translate to hostility." In such a context of role-play where a potential future novelist is full of nerves and wants to impress, your willingness to interact with them despite having expressed reservations about such a thing can come off as being dishonest or trying too hard to be inclusive. Be reserved, but don't be outspoken if you're going to give someone a chance! Having confirmed for you what you feel and believe is a far greater lesson and experience than if you go in having told your partner exactly how you feel about them and their style.

On the reverse, don't assume you're a flawless creature. Everyone has quirks, cliches, etc that rub others the wrong way; and while it can be interpreted as endearing to some, it can become quite intolerable if you refuse to eat your piece of humble pie, too. Writing isn't easy, either. People make the assumption that putting together a work such as this in a single night is something that comes easily to me and while I am doing it now and it might be appealing to some, I'm fully aware that not all of my intended audience will feel any desire to give it a chance. Appealing to a wide variety of persons is difficult when the content you produce can only appeal to a group of persons who enjoy your style and content.

But don't lose hope! Appeal is very subjective, and thus it will always be impossible to appeal to everyone. Does that mean you must learn a different style of writing? Or perhaps you should shelter yourself in a circle of like-minded individuals? What good will it do you to explore things if there is no growth?

The problem with most artists nowadays is a lack of self-awareness. The term "artist", while reserved for the visual arts, could be applied to anyone who produces a work which can be appreciated by an audience. The unfortunate truth to modern art (and yes, we include webcomics, video games, etc. Shush, naysayers! Society has evolved, so our words must evolve with us, or be abandoned to time for their limited application.) is that while it can produce some truly amazing things, there is an odd obsession with "hug-boxes". What I mean is, there is an odd belief that if an artist is in some way gifted and shows as much, they ought to be praised and championed as wholly perfect with no reason to improve. Such a belief is not only toxic, but wholly unhealthy.

When an artist is told "you're great as you are, don't change!" over and over, it limits their capacity to evolve beyond what they produce and explore new territory and new styles. Evolution is the principle of existence; to go beyond your current state. if one stagnates, their prospects diminish each day because their audience will continue to grow and experience things outside their circle more and more. One might assume that because a specific audience existed to consume that work that more like-minded persons will simply replace them. That is arrogant presumption.

As your audience grows, their attitude towards certain things and interests evolve as well. When your audience starts to move on, it's not only inevitable that a lack of evolution on your part will lose their interest; it's guaranteed that their assumed "replacements" will have less interest in your work. The problem isn't limited to persons such as Tim Buckley, or Todd Howard, though. Even in cinema and television, a lack of willingness to take an established concept and idea and make some adjustment or improvement to it can result in a great, albeit dated franchise falling by the wayside and became lost to time.

The reverse is true, too. If something changes too much, you risk ostracizing your core demographic and appealing to very few people, or nobody at all. The assumption of "we need to change this" or "being more like x is the best option" can, and often has, backfired. Only seldom does it work, and even then the risk rarely justifies the reward without anticipating a long-term return on investment. Financial investors are the only ones who should be making risky investments.

So, to get back on track, don't assume your style or content appeals to everyone, or even a huge group of people. At the same time, don't be eager to jump into the pool without first dipping your toes into the water and gauging if it's too cold. A shock to your ego can be fatal and spell disaster if you've no way to recover from it.


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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 10:35 pm

Part 7: Breathing Space, or "how I conditioned myself for the vacuum of space by holding my breath"

As pointed out in a prior part, people make the rather silly assumption that writing is something that can happen on a whim. While anyone can write words down on a paper or type them on a computer, it takes a certain ability to turn those words into something worth paying attention to. In role-play, this is doubly-so because both sides are required to engage each other in a form of written fencing. One role-player will attempt a strike, and it is their partner's obligation to either respond or surrender and forfeit their role entirely. Doing anything else is mean-spirited and ought to be met with disgruntled, (and tempered) outrage. Don't yell, scream, or curse; simply express your side and detach.

In another way, sometimes you're feeling rather drained from an extensive role-play session, but still want to participate in other areas where the role-play is occurring. It would be fairly irresponsible to assume your partner is aware of this fact, unless your writing can express such things. Even if that is so, it's still unfair to assume your partner is so aware. Instead, if you are still participating in other areas and your partner is aware of your activity, be sure you've alerted them to your current state. A partner that curses you out or otherwise expresses discontent shouldn't be given anymore of your time and be told as much.

To quote an unknown author, "Kill them with kindness, and bury them with favors." Simply put, be kind and courteous in all your exchanges (whether in a role-play, or conversation) and lend them the opportunity to do the same. If you are willing to engage them in something that you are not used to/uncomfortable with and they offer you no courtesy to step back or otherwise take a break, then part ways in the kindest sense and be done with the matter. Prolonging the engagement and antagonizing each other only fuels the fires and resolves nothing.

On the other hand, disrupting a role-play with a demand or requesting something out of character can be seen as counter-intuitive to an exchange. If possible, contact them privately. If not, then put it in brackets or meet them on a forum that permits non-disruptive out-of-character interactions. This could assist in helping both sides improve their ability while allowing the role-play to continue as clean and comprehensive as possible. If something happens during a role-play that you feel shouldn't or wasn't detailed enough, contact your partner privately and allow them to edit a post, or attempt another reply.

Finally, if you need time to step back and think about where a role-play is going or just need to regain your energy and interest, then communicate to your partner(s) that such is the case. Otherwise, they may interpret your absence as giving them the middle finger or something else. Don't allow assumptions to be made without good reason!


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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Wed Sep 28, 2016 10:46 pm

Part 8: The "Human" Condition

This is where this work concludes, but not without some parting words, first. Even if you already practice these behaviors and such, it doesn't hurt to consider this work with an open mind and reflect on it. Often, we make the mistake of thinking that because we know and do things already, that re-learning them is somehow to our detriment. Often, the "once is enough" attitude we employ helps us to overlook crucial details and miss important things we didn't see the first time.

And that's what it is to be a role-player, and more, "Human". Everyone has a touch of pride, a touch of compassion, a touch of hardheadedness, a touch of empathy, a touch of nerves, and a touch of hotheadedness. The secret to living a fuller, more richer life and being a more interesting, more competent role-player isn't to distance yourself from those qualities, but to embrace them and apply them in small doses. Situations where you can have a profound influence on the direction of a role-play are opportunities to stretch your wings! Situations where you need to step back and allow your partner to have input, are a chance to prove your willingness to let others have the spotlight. Regardless, don't be afraid of being one thing or many things. Just don't forget that you can't always be one or the other!

And finally, have fun! Role-play isn't simply an exchange; it's an opportunity to create your own world, to explore others from a new perspective or to witness the world of others from an outsider perspective. If you are not having fun, then ask yourself why not. If it's because you use too much detail, ask others how you might improve on that! If it's a lack of details, appeal to the better nature of others and ask them to engage you on that level! Just remember the three E's: Engaged, Empathetic, Experienced.

Have fun, dear reader!
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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Sun Oct 16, 2016 10:15 pm

You're a pretty cool person, Bob ♪
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PostSubject: Re: Bob The Ninja Presents: A comprehensive explanation on role-play   Today at 12:51 pm

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